Indoor Air Quality

Breathe Smarter

Your respiratory system can sense problems with air quality long before somebody says, ‘Maybe we’d better get the air tested.” Chances are, you will have a pretty good idea about what the problem is. People with pre-existing health conditions may be even quicker to feel the negative effects of contaminants in the air. If the school’s air handling system is recirculating indoor air, rising carbon dioxide and humidity levels can cause headaches and sleepiness. Mould is often a worry when there has been water damage in a school. Cleaning, maintenance and construction activities can release dust and fumes into the air. Report concerns about air quality to the principal. It’s the principal’s job to investigate and deal with those reports.  Tell your steward and your health and safety representative about your concerns. Get in touch with your ETFO local for more support. Improved indoor air quality is good for everyone’s achievement!

Bad weather in your classroom?

Spring thaw and early rains can put school rooftops to the test. When the roof leaks into the building, it takes more than a few well-placed buckets to deal with health and safety concerns. Dripping water near electrical equipment can be a hazardous combination. Wet floors are slip hazards. Saturated ceiling tiles can fall. Mould grows on wet building materials. If you see dripping or seeping water in the building, report it as a health and safety hazard to the principal. It is the principal’s job to investigate and deal with water damage.  And it is the school board’s job to make sure that you have a safe place to work.  Tell your steward and your health and safety representative. Get in touch with your ETFO local for more support. Don’t put up with bad weather in your classroom!

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